Choosing Between Two Equally Qualified Candidates

By now we are all well aware that there is a competition for talent and the leverage companies had when hiring between 2009 and 2012 has now lessened if not disappeared. We’ve been sharing articles educating and advising how to be an employer of choice and how to market your company brand and its jobs so candidates are highly motivated to want to work for you. Certainly, many of our readers are doing a good job in that regard and, with our assistance, are attracting the right candidates and finding themselves in the most desirable position of making a hiring decision between fully-qualified candidates.

We’ve just come across an article written by Ritesh Chudasama, a Sr. Technical Recruiter @ Rishi Infotech Pvt Ltd that addresses “Choosing between Two Equally Qualified Candidates”. Our clients are already in possession of some of the relevant information Ritesh discusses gleaned from our face-to-face interviews with the candidates and from due diligence Reference Research we provide. 

It is clearly in everyone’s best interest to consider all aspects of your needs as well as the candidates’ career ambitions and commitment when choosing one great candidate over another.  Enjoy the article.

Jim Fairfax, jimf@kitchenerexecutive.com

CHOOSING BETWEEN TWO EQUALLY QUALIFIED CANDIDATES
By: Ritesh Chudasama, Recruiter

Choosing between two

You’ve gone through the whole interview process – congratulations! But the hard part might not be over. You’ve got it narrowed down to two great candidates who both exhibit the strong qualities you are looking for and have similar work experience. Now you’re in a dilemma. How do you pick one great candidate over another?

Unfortunately, there is no easy way to decide (unless you flip a coin or eeny, meeny, miny, moe it which for the record, I do NOT recommend). But here are some things you should consider if torn between two or more great candidates:

Consider the Culture

If you didn’t establish in the interview what kind of environment your candidates work well in, a little Googling about their previous employer should tell you (reference checking will do this as well). Company culture is more than just one of those corporate jargon buzzwords. Determining which one of your candidates most fits into your corporate culture is probably one of the most important decisions you need to make.

Consider the Manager

Maybe you’re the manager this position will report to or maybe you’re hiring for someone else. Either way, you should consider the managers’ style and the candidates you have in front of you. Perhaps from the interview you’ve gathered that one of your candidates prefers some hand holding and constant direction from their manager. And perhaps the other prefers to work with needing little direction, on their own. Determine the managerial

(or the person that you are hiring for). A good fit between the manager and employee will make this hire much more successful in the long run.

Consider their Want

From interviewing your candidates you should be able to determine how badly they want your job. One candidate might be at a job currently and doesn’t really need to make a move. One might have been looking for months and this is the perfect job they’ve been waiting for. Perhaps your company is in an industry that is a hobby or interest of one of your candidates. The bottom line is, someone who wants your job is always going to work harder for you than someone who just wanted to get away from his or her current job. Make sure you know why your candidates are applying for this position and what their current job situation is.

Assess their excitement level

A job seeker’s enthusiasm for the position also is a pivotal deciding factor when you’ve narrowed the field down to just two people. Applicants who demonstrate an eagerness to learn and take on new challenges will likely bring the same initiative and positive attitude to their jobs. Ask questions such as, “How do you keep your skills current?” to gauge the candidate’s career ambitions and commitment to continual learning.

To learn more about the person’s attitude toward work, consider inquiring about his or her best and worst jobs and the insights gained from these experiences. Responses may reveal valuable information about a person’s ability to adapt to varying work environments and approaches to management.

Consider their Connections

While hiring based on talent and experience comes first, knowing whom your candidates are connected to is never a bad thing. Your company is in business to grow and succeed and if your new employee is connected to people that can help make that happen, it’s a bonus. Check out their LinkedIn profile to see if they are connected to any business leads you have. If you have a big project coming up and will need Project Managers, see if they’re connected to any. You should never hire based solely on connections (unless it’s for a sales position, perhaps) but this is always a good thing to know and consider.

Consider any Bonuses

You never can tell where a new hire might end up. Making a good hire might result in you hiring a future VP of your company. The goal is always to nurture your employees and help them grow in their careers with your business. So look for any skills or experience that might not be necessary for them in this current job, but could potentially allow them to move up in your company someday. Skills like knowing another language, certain software programs or having different certifications or education are all things you should consider a bonus.

preference of each candidate and pair that up with your managerial style 

(or the person that you are hiring for). A good fit between the manager and employee will make this hire much more successful in the long run.

Consider their Want

From interviewing your candidates you should be able to determine how badly they want your job. One candidate might be at a job currently and doesn’t really need to make a move. One might have been looking for months and this is the perfect job they’ve been waiting for. Perhaps your company is in an industry that is a hobby or interest of one of your candidates. The bottom line is, someone who wants your job is always going to work harder for you than someone who just wanted to get away from his or her current job. Make sure you know why your candidates are applying for this position and what their current job situation is.

Assess their excitement level

A job seeker’s enthusiasm for the position also is a pivotal deciding factor when you’ve narrowed the field down to just two people. Applicants who demonstrate an eagerness to learn and take on new challenges will likely bring the same initiative and positive attitude to their jobs. Ask questions such as, “How do you keep your skills current?” to gauge the candidate’s career ambitions and commitment to continual learning.

To learn more about the person’s attitude toward work, consider inquiring about his or her best and worst jobs and the insights gained from these experiences. Responses may reveal valuable information about a person’s ability to adapt to varying work environments and approaches to management.

Consider their Connections

While hiring based on talent and experience comes first, knowing whom your candidates are connected to is never a bad thing. Your company is in business to grow and succeed and if your new employee is connected to people that can help make that happen, it’s a bonus. Check out their LinkedIn profile to see if they are connected to any business leads you have. If you have a big project coming up and will need Project Managers, see if they’re connected to any. You should never hire based solely on connections (unless it’s for a sales position, perhaps) but this is always a good thing to know and consider.

Consider any Bonuses

You never can tell where a new hire might end up. Making a good hire might result in you hiring a future VP of your company. The goal is always to nurture your employees and help them grow in their careers with your business. So look for any skills or experience that might not be necessary for them in this current job, but could potentially allow them to move up in your company someday. Skills like knowing another language, certain software programs or having different certifications or education are all things you should consider a bonus.

Candidates who are looking for a job aren’t going to stay on the market long (especially great ones)! The faster you can make a decision, the more likely you are going to hire a great new employee for your company. Don’t make a decision in haste though! Considering the current state of your needs and what this person could bring to you now and in the future is very important. After taking into account all of the above, you’ll rest easy knowing you made the right choice. 

 

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